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The Best Chicken I have Ever Eaten

 
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DLFant



Joined: 01 Sep 2015
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2015 1:10 pm    Post subject: The Best Chicken I have Ever Eaten Reply with quote

Test Results Best chicken I ever ate!!

First I would like to thank everyone for the hard work in research and development that has been done here. I am not a chef by any means but I have cooked a lot at home.

Also my wife was a Home Economics and Culinary Arts teacher for 32 years. I do have an understanding of what it takes to develop recipe, having said that I feel like I have cheated because I just found this site last week.

I grew up here in Texas my mother and my mother in law were both very amazing old time southern cooks. I also grew up in church and have attended countless socials, dinner on the grounds and picnics that has afforded me the chance to have tasted hundreds of different variations of fried chicken.

Hands down my motherís was the best until I ate my mother I lawís which passed momís. Now my wife being the above mentioned teacher has taken her motherís recipe and tweaked until it is the best we had eaten anywhere. Until now that is.

The thing I enjoy is trying to do what you have done here match other recipes.
Over the years I have successfully done that with a number of things. Long John Silverís Fish, Papadux catfish, Black-eyed peaís Cajun Grilled Fish, A local famous Chicken Fried Steak, KFC Cole Slaw, KFC Biscuits and so on.
I have tried numbers of time to replicate the O.R. nothing has come close.

Last week we made TC28 which I thought was the latest version. My wife and I made it together, we pan fried it because I wasnít up on pressure frying. She and I both agree hands down it was the best Fried Chicken either of us has every eaten, Thank you to the Colonel!!

I would also like to thank Ken_Griffiths for suggestion he made when I discovered the TC34 was the latest version.
We have since done a comparison of the TC34, DT20 and Lumpy721.

I will say it like this:
If you were to take any one of them and secretly replace it at any KFC Store I have been it the last 20 years people would say WOW! Your Chicken has drastically improved.

I stop short saying it is just like the O.R. of the early 70ís probably because of "My" technique although I did pressure fry them I am using an old Sears pressure Fryer with no gauge with the jiggler on top and all of them came out not quite done. I first tried browning @350 2 min. and pressuring for 7 min and 1 to cool down. Then the same for 2 min. and pressuring for 10 min and 1 to cool down the later was still a not done inside and almost too brown outside.

I have a new Fagor 6 Quart pressure cooker but it says it is not for frying. I would like any suggestions on using it anyway? Because from what I have read now days no one makes a home pressure fryer. I also have the Sears that could be fit with a pressure gaugeand maybe that would help? Is there anything in a 6 to 10 quart fryer anywould recommended?

I would like to give back in some way to the work done here. If anyone would like any of the above mentioned recipes I will be most happy to share.

DLFant
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Megazoid_



Joined: 08 Aug 2015
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2015 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I have a new Fagor 6 Quart pressure cooker but it says it is not for frying. I would like any suggestions on using it anyway? Because from what I have read now days no one makes a home pressure fryer. I also have the Sears that could be fit with a pressure gauge and maybe that would help? Is there anything in a 6 to 10 quart fryer any would recommended?


I'd also like to know the answer to this.

Thing is, I actually went out and bought a Magefesa Star R Stainless Steel Pressure Cooker (10-Quart) years ago and it stated "Do not use for pressure frying with oil". I was too scared to use it to be honest, and ended up giving it to the local charity shop. I'm a very risk averse person. Smile
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Magnus Max



Joined: 30 May 2015
Posts: 20

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2015 3:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Your not likely to find a new cooker that will allow for pressure frying, as far as the manufacturer is concerned...you know, the whole legal disclaimer thing.

On the other hand, I doubt that many of the newer cookers out on today's market could handle the heat, you'd have to consider the gaskets heat tolerance levels, safety features, max temperature on safety fuse, etc.

I use an old 16 qt. Mirro Matic unit, and had to source/find the correct gasket, which I always have a spare. There are some silicone ones which are not recommended due to the heat & prone to failure.

The gaskets which I use are a black rubber & match up to what was originally used by the Colonel & his former franchisee's.

I added a pressure gauge, mostly for a piece of mind, but also to verify that I was within the correct temp & pressure range. At this point I could probably operate fine without it, but I like to always know at a glance where everything is at while cooking.

I also added two new Wisconsin pressure release valves, which just allow me to decompress the pot that much faster, in addition to releasing the regulator weight. It might not matter to some, but some videos I've watched seem to take too long to release, or the operator is forcing the lid off too soon, which could obviously pose an undesired problem/effect.

I will eventually get a smaller unit for doing test batches, as I don't always want to cook an entire chicken or have to make additional adjustments for a small load. There's enough challenges to consider w/ the whole process already. I think I'm leaning toward an old Presto 8 qt. unit if I can find one, after I find out if I can source the right gasket. If it goes that way, I'll probably do some mods on the unit (add ports) for gauge & added release valves.

I'm not familiar w/ using the Wear-Ever Chicken Bucket or the pricey $$ "Chicken Express" units, but if I'm not mistaken, i think they operate at a different PSI. Those are options to maybe consider also, myself however...I'm a bit more of a purist & like to work within the parameters of how it was traditionally done my the man who started it all.

I did a lot of research before I did my first cook, after the first two batches I was no longer phased or had concern of the unknown. I always cook outside, took every precaution within reason and use the side burner of my BBQ grill. My next project though, will be to get a better burner w/ jets...so that I can heat the oil to operating temp much faster.
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Randie



Joined: 09 Dec 2010
Posts: 13
Location: Colorado, USA

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2015 4:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I started out using the Wearever Chicken Fryer. It's a low pressure cooker (10lbs, I think) and it's really not any different than a regular pressure cooker. I read all the stuff on the internet about not frying in pressure cookers. That seemed odd to me, as my Wearever does exactly that, and so does every commercial pressure fryer. Maybe it's due to a potential gasket failure? But then again, my Wearever made in the 70's surely doesn't sport state of the art gasket materials and it seals just fine.

So I picked up a relatively new Presto Professional pressure cooker at the local thrift store. It's stainless steel with a flat weight that turns for venting. It has a white, silicone sealing gasket and appears to be the same material my silicone hot pads and bake ware are made of. They say good to 500 degrees Fahrenheit. So I gave it a try.

I was a bit timid at first, but finally grew comfortable with it for two reasons:

1) Like all pressure cookers, it isn't going to blow up because of the safety release valve. Too much pressure and the valve pops out. It might make a mess, but it won't blow up.
2) The fryer is going to operate the majority of the time below 300 degrees. Just read HS's patent application someone just posted.

I've probably used it 25 times in the past 4 years for frying chicken. Only once did something unexpected happen. I reuse the flavorful oil many times before starting over. But as the oil ages, it does tend to foam. And when venting, that foaming oil started coming through the vent as I was releasing the pressure. But I left the weight in place and simply moved it to the sink for the water cool down. It sure made a mess on the stove, but that's about it. To release pressure, use a utensil to lift the weight up a bit and make sure it's just steam escaping. Don't take the weight off completely until most of the pressure is out. Alternatively, just cool the cooker under running water in the sink until the pressure is out.

I think the manufacturers don't recommend pressure frying in them because some idiot heated the thing up to 500 degrees and the gasket melted. So to prevent the lawsuits, they just tell you not to do it.

But we are not idiots! Shocked We are responsible in our cooking endeavors. You probably have a greater chance of hurting your self in the kitchen by washing a knife, or whacking an avocado pit with a knife while it's in your hand (there are a surprising number of "avocado pit removal" accidents every year!).

Seriously, just don't fill the cooker more than half full of oil, and be careful not to add too much chicken. You want about an inch or two of space between the bubbling oil and the top of the cooker prior to capping. After capping, turn down the heat to medium and NEVER leave the kitchen while you are pressure frying.

One last tip I read that makes sense to me: Don't go out and buy an old, beat up cooker thinking it will be no loss if it fails. They say that old and abused cookers can have hairline cracks that can lead to a failure. Find something that is gently, or hardly, used and made within the past 10 years.

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The Chook Cook



Joined: 24 Jul 2015
Posts: 99
Location: Perth, Western Australia

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2015 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you want a REAL Pressure FRYER contact

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I have one from them ... 10QT it cost me about $A500 to get sent to Australia, but it is worth it, and it produces fantastic chicken




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These are designed for pressure frying and comes with a very thick instruction manual with dozen of recipes and fried chicken recipes, fish and chips etc ..... and gives you the times you need to cook everything ... so no guessing!

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DLFant



Joined: 01 Sep 2015
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2015 9:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="Randie"]. I reuse the flavorful oil many times before starting over. But as the oil ages
I was courious How do you flavor your oil?
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Randie



Joined: 09 Dec 2010
Posts: 13
Location: Colorado, USA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 11, 2015 12:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't intentionally flavor the oil. It just picks up the flavors of the chicken and whatever seasoning mix I use in the coating. Strangely, it seems to get sweeter over time. It does get darker, so when I do toss it out, everyone wants to know why the chicken and fries suddenly got a lot lighter!

I've heard of restaurants that always leave some of the old oil/shortening when they add new stuff. If I recall from a Food Channel program, one restaurant was bragging that some of the oil in their fryer was decades old. They say it gives is a better flavor. I don't know about decades, though!

For me, it's about both the taste, and the money. I just can't afford to toss it out after a few fryings. And as long as it isn't too dark, it sure makes for flavorful frying!

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The Colonel
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Joined: 18 Jun 2006
Posts: 2070

PostPosted: Fri Sep 11, 2015 4:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DLFant,

What an honor, my friend. Thank you very much for the kind words, and the impressive review. But what makes me happiest, is just the fact that SOMEONE out there is enjoying truly great fried chicken again. Wink

I also have little doubt that DT's recipe would be awesome as well... I know for a fact he has put a lot of years, and hard work into his recipes.

A handy tip though or two:

If you pressure fried for between 8 and 10 minutes, and the middle of your chicken pieces still showed signs of blood, then - without any doubt - your chicken pieces are too large. Colonel Sanders recommended chickens weighing between 2.25 and 2.5 pounds MAX... I believe also that KFC Japan (according to our good member Chook) utilise 1kg Chickens.

As implied above, the wisdom behind this is that the individual cuts, or pieces of chicken are smaller... Thus ensuring an even cook throughout each entire piece. Wink

Hehe, early on I spent many months fussing, cussing and fuming over this very issue... Until I finally soaked up Colonel Sanders Patent, and it all clicked.

I use a 10 quart pressure cooker, with 4 litres of oil, and 1.25 kg of chicken pieces (usually thighs and drumsticks). Colonel Sanders favourite piece was always a drumstick, but for me personally, I LOVE the thighs... Smile I bring the oil to 350 degrees F, drop the chicken, wait 15 seconds, then cap... Pressure builds inside of 2 minutes, I turn the heat down to low, and cook for a further 6 to 7 minutes.

Finally, I release the pressure, take the pot to the sink and run cold water over the lid (which releases the pressure in around 10 seconds..) Then I place the chicken in a pan (on wire), and place it in an oven at 160 degrees F for ten minutes.

Then we eat!

Anyway, keep up the great effort, mate! And thank you once again for the genuine feedback!

TC

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DLFant



Joined: 01 Sep 2015
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 11, 2015 3:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for the advise Colonel that makes sense my chicken was bigger about 4 1/2 pounds and I do remember KFC pices being smaller. I will try with smaller chicken.
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